University of Minnesota Extension
www.extension.umn.edu
612-624-1222
Menu Menu

Extension > Minnesota Crop News > Minimum Stands for Winter and Spring Cereals

Friday, April 3, 2015

Minimum Stands for Winter and Spring Cereals

Most winter cereals have broken dormancy by now and thus is it time to evaluate stands and decide whether to keep the stand and thus the field or move on to plan B.  The same is true for any early seeded spring cereals. The easiest time to do a stand count is probably when the crop is in the two- to three-leaf stage since tillers are not visible yet, making counting easier.

To do a stand count, use one of the following two methods:

1.      Count the number of plants in a foot of row at several locations in the field.  Take an average and convert in plants per acre using Table 1.

2.      Take a hula-hoop, let it fall, and count the number of plants inside the hoop.  Repeat this at random several times across the field and calculate an average.  Use Table 2 to convert the count to an approximate population per square foot or acre.

Keep stands of 15 or more plants per square foot  (or just over 650,000 plants per acre) this early in the year as the crop (either spring or winter) will for plenty of time to continue to tiller, allowing the crop to reach 85 to 90% of its maximum grain yield potential.  


Table 1.        Average number of plants per foot of row for different row spacing and plant densities per acre.
                                                           

Plants per acre (times 1 million)
Row Width
0.8
0.9
1.0
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5









6”
9.2
10.3
11.5
12.6
13.8
14.9
16.1
17.2
7”
10.7
12.1
13.4
14.7
16.1
17.4
18.7
20.1
10”
15.3
17.2
19.1
21.0
23.0
24.9
26.8
28.7
12”
18.4
20.7
23.0
25.3
27.5
29.8
32.1
34.4


Table 2.        Adjustment factors to multiply the number of plants inside a hoop and convert the number in to number of plants per acre.

Hoop Diameter
Multiply by


30”
8,900
32”
7,800
34”
6,900
36”
6,200
38”
5,500





No comments:

Post a Comment

  • © Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
  • The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Privacy