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Extension > Minnesota Crop News > March 2016

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

When is Deep too Deep?



Like last year,  there are again parts of the state that are very dry and with little stored soil moisture. As seeding of small grains has commenced the question arises whether you can seed too deep and which varieties, if any, tolerate deeper placement of seed than the ideal depth of 1.5 to 2.0 inches. A 2015 blog post detailing the ins and outs of seeding depth can be found here.

This winter, my project screened the coleoptile length of a number of the recent HRSW releases.  The results of that screening are posted below.


Thursday, March 24, 2016

Manage waterhemp in soybean with layered residual herbicides

Lisa Behnken, Extension Educator, Fritz Breitenbach, IPM Specialist SE Minnesota, Jeff Gunsolus, Extension Agronomist, Weed Science, and Phyllis Bongard, Content Development and Communications Specialist, University of Minnesota

With waterhemp becoming more widespread and herbicide resistant populations expanding, including multiple-resistant populations, waterhemp is increasingly difficult to manage. In addition, it has a long emergence pattern and frequently outlasts control of an early preemergence herbicide application. One strategy, described in the Crop News article, "Are you happy with your weed control in soybeans this fall?" is to layer residual herbicides to control glyphosate-resistant waterhemp by extending the duration of seedling control.

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

U of MN researchers seeking soybean growers to cooperate on study of impacts of seed treatments on soybean aphid and parasitic wasps

by Jonathan Dregni (Scientist), Robert Koch (Assistant Professor & Extension Entomologist), and George Heimpel (Professor)

Insecticidal seed treatments are used widely in soybean production. As with any new pest control technology we need to examine the potential for unintended consequences (see more here). University of Minnesota entomologists are looking for farmer collaborators willing to help study insecticidal seed treatments by allowing researchers to monitor populations of aphids and parasitic wasps in soybean fields planted with insecticide-treated and untreated seeds. Please contact Jonathan Dregni, U of MN scientist, if you or a neighbor would like to be involved, dreg0005@umn.edu or 651-207-3539.

Considerations when planting dicamba-tolerant soybean

by Lisa Behnken, Extension Educator, Fritz Breitenbach, IPM Specialist SE Minnesota, Jeff Gunsolus, Extension Agronomist, Weed Science, and Phyllis Bongard, Content Development and Communications Specialist, University of Minnesota

Monsanto's Roundup Ready 2 Xtend™ soybean, which is tolerant to both glyphosate and dicamba, is available for purchase this spring. While this will eventually offer another option for controlling glyphosate resistant and other tough-to-control weeds, it also brings up label and marketing concerns for the 2016 growing season.

Chomping at the bit yet?

Although there is some snow in the forecast for tomorrow across much of Minnesota, the weather has been unseasonably mild and the frost is already out of the ground in many areas.  The first reports of small grain being seeded reached me yesterday and that begged the question whether it is too early the seed small grains.  In 2012, the last week of winter and first week of spring were also unseasonable warm. At that time I wrote a short article about the risks and rewards of early planting.  Please check back here if you like reread the blog post and  refresh your memory.

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

March 3 Sauk Centre Hay Auction Summary


by Dan Martens, Extension Educator, Stearns-Benton-Morrison Counties, Crop Systems Focus
marte011@umn.edu; ph 320-968-5077

I am attaching my summaries for the March 3, 2016 Sauk Centre Hay auction.

1. March 3, 2016 Summary - All loads sold, grouped and averaged based on bale and hay or bedding type.

2. History of Selected Lots - averages for recent years, and each sale so far this year, Medium Square Alfalfa by 25 RFV groups, Grass Hay 5-9% Protein, Straw

3. Graph - Medium Square Groups from RFV 101-200. The Red Line is for the 2015-16 market Oct 1 through March 3.

I don’t remember and auction where I’ve seen as many “outliers” – a load or two in a group that either sold way higher than the rest or way lower. On the graph, the 175-200 RFV group looks like that price dropped some, but if I took out the low load, the other 3 would average very much like the last auction.
Feb 18, 6 Loads RFV 175-200 sold at $105, 155, 160, 170, 170, 185.
Mar 3, 4 Loads RFV 175-200 sold at $95, 135, 140, 185.
Mar 3, a load listed as 4th cutting grass with 25% protein and 13.5 moisture sold for $170. That was a unique load of hay
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