Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from 2009

Wireworms in Small Grains

by Dr. Ian MacRae, Extension Entomologist
I've received reports of wireworms in small grains this season - not surprising this year given that wireworm tend to be more active in cooler conditions. There are several species of wireworms in the Red River Valley and although they're usually neither a frequent nor wide-spread problem in the RRV, when they do occur, damage can be quite significant even leading to a total field loss.

Orange Wheat Blossom Midge: Vigilance is in order

Orange wheat blossom midge (Figure 1) as a wheat pest has been off the front page as a major production problem in NW MN for many years. Populations in the region have been small enough that significant outbreaks and associated yield losses have been of small concern. However, we learned in the mid-90’s that given the right circumstances, this insect can increase its population rapidly and cause major yield losses in a very short time frame.

Rusts are Diseases of Economic Concern on Regionally-Produced Oat Crop

Charla Hollingsworth, UM Extension Plant Pathologist, and Jeff Stein, South Dakota State University Plant Pathologist
Crown rust (caused by Puccinia coronata var avenae) and stem rust (caused by Puccinia graminis f.sp. avenae) are widespread and common on oat in the North Central (NC) state region. If environmental conditions promote rust development on susceptible hosts prior to grain fill, significant crop losses are likely to occur. While both diseases are responsible for repeated losses in oat, crown rust has a history of being the most damaging in this region because epidemics occur with more regularity.