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Showing posts from June, 2014

Reduce Risk of Fallow or Flooded Soil Syndrome with Cover Crops

by Lizabeth Stahl, Extension Educator in Crops, Fabian Fernandez and Daniel Kaiser, Extension Nutrient Management Specialists

The challenging spring of 2014 has resulted in wide-spread planting delays in parts of the state and a significant amount of acres that remain unplanted at this time. If the decision has been made to take the "prevented planting" option for insurance purposes, the question remains about what to do with these acres. In other parts of the state, extensive flooding and/or severe hail has significantly damaged standing crops. In either case, leaving the ground bare greatly increases the risk of not only soil erosion, but also the risk of "Fallow Syndrome" the following year.

Soybean and Corn Seedling Diseases Increase With Flooded and Wet Soil Conditions

Dean Malvick, Extension Plant Pathologist
Photo 1. Flooded soybean field in Minnesota.
Most of the soybean and corn crop is emerged and growing well across Minnesota. Seedling disease problems in scattered soybean and corn fields have been reported in early June and more are expected due to wet and flooded fields. Abundant (or excessive) rainfall and fluctuating temperatures and have created excellent conditions for seedling diseases. This is a good time to check fields for seedling disease problems and efficacy of seed treatments.

Infection of seedlings before or after emergence can result in dead plants, rotted and discolored roots, stunted and discolored plants, and wilting. The problems often occur in patches in fields. Seedling infection can also lead to damage that may not fully develop until mid to late summer, as with Phytophthora root and stem rot and sudden death syndrome. Disease can cause serious damage, but it is just one of many stresses that seedlings are encounter…

Prevented plant: cover crop and forage options

Phyllis Bongard, Educational Content Development and Communications Specialist
The weather continues to challenge farmers in parts of Minnesota. With the late planting window closing, cover crop options for prevented plant acres should be considered. Crops selected for forage use would also be good choices as cover crops. There are several options depending on what a producer's needs and expectations are.