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Join next week's Field Notes discussion on early season weed management

An all-new weekly crops program from the University of Minnesota Extension Crops Team! Join us Wednesday, May 12th for Field Notes when we welcome Debalin Sarangi, University of Minnesota Extension Corn & Soybean Weed Specialist and Tom Peters, University of Minnesota Sugarbeet Weed Specialist to talk about weed control this year, and how the current spring weather and soil condition might influence our management decisions. While the weather this year allowed for early planting, many questions and concerns have surfaced around effective weed management strategies when we have faced cool and dry soil conditions. These include the effectiveness of preemergence herbicides and the biology of weed emergence and subsequent growth. We will discuss these environmental conditions along with other crop emergence considerations on the next Field Notes program on Wednesday, May 12th at 7:30am. What is Field Notes? The Field Notes program is designed for farmers and agricultural professionals
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Pest alert: Black cutworm

 by Bruce Potter, IPM specialist Figure 1. Black cutworm moths 4/24 - 4/30/2021 (maximum moths/2 nights/county) Black cutworm (BCW) moth arrivals into Minnesota increased during the week of April 24 to 30. Southerly wind flows from April 26 to 28 brought moths to southern Minnesota and particularly to an area in SW and SC Minnesota. The area where moth captures were large enough to indicate the potential for damage from larvae (nine or more moths/2 nights) includes Nobles, Cottonwood, Watonwan, Martin, and neighboring counties. Fillmore County also had a significant capture (Figure 1). Migrating BCW often drop out on the backside of thunderstorms and the locations of this spring’s moth captures are as variable as rainfall. Moth migration further into the northwest part of the state has been blocked by high pressure. Note which fields had not been tilled and planted by April 26. This is one of several clues you will be able to use help focus scouting efforts for black cutworms in a few

Checking Stands and Replanting Decisions

by Jochum Wiersma, Extension small grains specialist The wheat that was seeded immediately after Easter started to emerge by the middle of last week. Pretty much the same day as was predicted by the accumulated growing degree model for wheat that is available on the NDAWN system. The wheat that was seeded in the week of April 20 is, as predicted by the NDAWN system, just about to peek through. I do not expect stand issues despite the very cool conditions we have had to endure this past month. Nevertheless, this is a good time to determine your initial stand and evaluate your seeding operation. It is much easier to count the number of plants when the seedlings have not started to initiate tillers yet. Tillering will start as soon as the seedlings reach the three-leaf stage. To do a stand count, use one of the following two methods:   Count the number of plants in a foot of row at several locations in the field. Take an average and convert to plants per acre using Table 1.  Take a hula-h

It’s time to start thinking about your irrigation water management

 by Vasu Sharma, Extension irrigation specialist and Taylor Becker, Extension educator What is irrigation water management? Irrigation water management is the timing and regulating of irrigation water applications in a way that satisfies the water requirement of the crop without wasting water, plant nutrients, or energy and without degrading the soil. It means applying water according to your crop needs and how much your soil can hold (consistent with the intake characteristics of the soil) (NRCS Irrigation Guide). The very first step in good irrigation water management is knowledge of your soil type and crop water use. Why do we need it? Proper irrigation water management is key to improving crop production and reducing costs. Applying too much or too little water at wrong times is a common problem. Too much water leads to leaching of nutrients, soil erosion, water logging, and waste of water and energy, ultimately leading to reduced yields and higher costs. Too little water at a time

Nutrient Management Podcast: Potassium

In this episode of the Nutrient Management Podcast, three U of M researchers discuss potassium management.  What key factors impact potassium availability in soils?  Currently, Minnesota suggests banding potassium is more efficient than broadcast application. What are your thoughts on the band versus broadcast debate?  There have been some questions over the winter related to potash application on soybean. What are some key takeaways from your research and should farmers consider alternative forms of potassium fertilizer? Listen to the podcast View the podcast transcript Guests: Dan Kaiser, Extension nutrient management specialist Jeff Vetsch, U of M researcher Leanna Leverich, U of M graduate research assistant Additional resources: Minnesota corn fertilizer guidelines Updates to corn and soybean potassium fertilizer guidelines in Minnesota  (April 2019) Over-application of potash containing chloride can hurt soybean yields odcast: Phosphorus and potassium 5 tips for cutting phosphoru

Reminder: Early season crop pests focus of this week's Field Notes discussion

Join us on Wednesday for Field Notes when we welcome Bruce Potter and Stephan Melson to talk about early season crop pests and scouting. Bruce Potter, an Extension IPM Specialist located at the Southwest Research and Outreach Center in Lamberton and Stephan Melson, the director of the United Ag Tech Minnesota Independent Crop Consultants,  will comment on the 2021 crop pest and scouting activities for field crops.  Field Notes will run  Wednesday mornings from 7:30-8:00 a.m . throughout the growing season. It features a live webinar with interactive discussions to address in-season cropping issues as they arise. Topics may include nutrient management, agronomics, pest management, equipment, and more. Learn more and register   Can’t make the live session? No problem. The discussion-based series will be posted immediately following the webinar to your favorite podcast-streaming service to listen at your convenience. Listen in your web browser ( z.umn.edu/FieldNotespodcast ) or subscribe

Potassium management

In  this episode  of the Nutrient Management Podcast, three U of M researchers discuss potassium management.  What key factors impact potassium availability in soils?  Currently, Minnesota suggests banding potassium is more efficient than broadcast application. What are your thoughts on the band versus broadcast debate?  There have been some questions over the winter related to potash application on soybean. What are some key takeaways from your research and should farmers consider alternative forms of potassium fertilizer? Thank you to Minnesota's Agricultural Fertilizer Research and Education Council (AFREC) for supporting the podcast.